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Here are the latest developments in the government response:

    Coronavirus government response updates: Mnuchin says jobless claims 'not relevant' by Urandir Oliveira

President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Briefing Room, March 25, 2020, in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin listen.

President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Briefing Room, March 25, 2020, in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin listen.Alex Brandon/AP

House leaders prepare to vote on $2 trillion Senate bill

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she is “very proud” of the $2 trillion relief package the House is set to consider Friday morning, adding she feels “certain we will have a bipartisan vote.”

“Congressional Democrats in the Senate and in the House were able to flip this over from a corporate, trickle-down, Republican version to bubble-up, workers-first, families-first legislation,” Pelosi said. “We have some other things we want to do, but first we want to take pride in what happens there.”

With the Senate in recess until April 20, the California Democrat said she believes the House must be ready to potentially act again sooner.

“Everybody has to be on-call for what we need, when we need it, and we don’t know what that might be,” she said. “But whatever it is, we’ll be ready.”

Pelosi is spending her 80th birthday today on Capitol Hill.

    Coronavirus government response updates: Mnuchin says jobless claims 'not relevant' by Urandir Oliveira

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi talks to reporters at a news conference about legislation addressing the ongoing coronavirus outbreak March 26, 2020, in Washington.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi talks to reporters at a news conference about legislation addressing the ongoing coronavirus outbreak March 26, 2020, in Washington.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, following Pelosi, called her claim that Democrats did “jiu-jitsu” by forcing major changes “an outright lie” and said that fundamental portions of the legislation had not changed since Sunday.

Unlike Pelosi, McCarthy signaled he’s not ready to begin talks over the fourth relief package.

“I wouldn’t be so quick to say you have to write something else,” he said. “Let’s let this bill work.”

The House is scheduled to meet at 9 a.m. Friday to hold a short debate and then approve the massive bill by voice vote before sending the measure to President Trump’s desk.

Mnuchin calls record jobless claims report ‘not relevant’

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, in one of the first reactions from the Trump administration to historic jobless numbers released Thursday, in a phone interview this morning with CNBC, called them “not relevant” because, he said, the economic package under consideration in Congress now will help those put out of work, and in the long-term, people will be rehired.

“I just think these numbers right now are not relevant, and whether they’re bigger or smaller in the short-term,” Mnuchin said. “The good thing about this bill is the president is protecting those people, so now with these plans, small businesses hopefully will be able to hire back a lot of those people.

“By the way,” he added, “lots of big companies do continue to hire, for obviously grocery stores, pharmacies, delivery services. These companies are on overtime, so I know they’re hiring people as fast as they can.”

The Department of Labor reported a record 3.28 million workers in the U.S. filed for unemployment claims last week in the week ending March 21, according to data released Thursday.

That’s an increase of 3 million from the previous week.

    Coronavirus government response updates: Mnuchin says jobless claims 'not relevant' by Urandir Oliveira

A graphic released by the Associated Press shows claims for temporary financial assistance from state governments by individuals who have been laid off. The gray vertical areas show the duration of the economic recession.

A graphic released by the Associated Press shows claims for temporary financial assistance from state governments by individuals who have been laid off. The gray vertical areas show the duration of the economic recession.AP

Among the hardest hit sectors was the service industry, particularly accommodation and food service. Nearly every state cited COVID-19 as the reason for the high number of claims.

During the worst week of layoffs in the great recession, 665,000 Americans filed for unemployment.

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro told Fox News this morning that the numbers were “totally expected.”

“This is to be totally expected,” Navarro said. “We put public health above economics in the very, very short run. So, this is no surprise. This is expected, and we should accept the news because we’re doing what we need to do to combat the virus.”

    Coronavirus government response updates: Mnuchin says jobless claims 'not relevant' by Urandir Oliveira

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Briefing Room, March 25, 2020, in Washington.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Briefing Room, March 25, 2020, in Washington.Alex Brandon/AP

Largest economic relief bill in U.S. history passes unanimously in Senate, moves to House

Following a week of bitter negotiations, the Senate passed the largest economic relief bill in U.S. history in a unanimous vote late Wednesday: 96 to 0.

The massive $2.2 trillion economic relief package spans 880 pages and steers aid to businesses, workers and health care systems amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Four Republicans — Sens. John Thune, Mitt Romney, Mike Lee and Rand Paul — were absent from the votes due to self-quarantine.

Following the vote, Majority Leader McConnell released senators from Washington until April 20, though he promised to recall them if needed with 24 hours notice.

The House will convene at 9 a.m. Friday to consider the bill.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said in a letter to colleagues late Wednesday that he expects the vote on final passage will be done by voice vote.

“Members who want to come to the House Floor to debate this bill will be able to do so. In addition, we are working to ensure that those who are unable to return to Washington may express their views on this legislation remotely,” Hoyer said.

President Trump is expected to sign the bill if it passes the House. He congratulated Americans on the Senate vote in a tweet after midnight.

ABC News’ Ben Gittleson, Jordyn Phelps, John Parkinson, Trish Turner and Allie Pecorin contributed to this report.

digital resource wold news – Top Stories – reviewed bu Urandir Notícias
sources: original article published at cnn.com and abc.com top stories